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Poems
Listed Alphabetically by Name of Author
 
A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | R | S | T | V | W | Y | Z
 
GARNEAU, Saint-Denys (1912-1943):
"Pines Against the Light" (1937)
IN: Daymond & Monkman, II, 272.
Comment: Originally written in French. Transl. John Glassco. Pines seen against the light are "like water/ Islands of clear water". Poem shows similarity to impressionistic landscape painting.
 
"My Eyes a River"
IN: Glassco, 113.
Comment: Originally written in French. Transl. G.V. Downes. Metaphorical relationship between "my eyes" and "a sunlit river".
 
"Landscape in Two Colours on a Ground of Sky"
IN: Glassco, 120-121.
Comment: Originally written in French. Transl. John Glassco. A landscape painting in words.
 
GEORGE, Don J.:
"Repose"
IN: Canadian Chamber of Contemporary Poetry, 281.
Comment: The cycle of the seasons. Nature is imagined as a mother.
 
GIGUÈRE, Roland (b. 1929)
"Greener Than Nature" (1965/1972)
IN: Daymond & Monkman, II, 462.
Comment: Originally written in French. Transl. F.R. Scott. Small poem. Reductionist style.
 
"Landscape Estranged"
IN: Glassco, 179.
Comment: Originally written in French. Transl. F.R. Scott. The destructive forces of the human psyche are mirrored in a landscape exposed to storm and snow.
 
"Polar Seasons"
IN: Glassco, 176-178.
Comment: Originally written in French. Transl. F.R. Scott. Symbolic exegesis of the polar seasons. Persona uses a prophetic voice.
 
GILLEPSIE, George William (d. 1847)
"Lines on Canada" (1843)
IN: Gerson & Davies, 82-83.
Comment: Praises the beauty of the landscape: " ... what for grandeur in season may vie/ With the beautiful tints of a Canada sky?"
 
GLICKMAN, Susan (b. 1953)
"A November Eclogue. For Robert Billings"
IN: Smith, D.B., 19-20.
Comment: Elegaic poem relating the mentioned poet's death to the grand scenery of Niagara Falls.
 
GOLD, Artie (b. 1947):
"Relativity of Spring"
IN: Norris, 159-161.
Comment: Complex poem. Highly sophisticated. Could be contrasted with romantic spring poems. Important feature: Some modern Canadian poetic references to natural phenomena have to be interpreted intertextually – read against earlier texts.
 
GOLDSMITH, Oliver (1794-1861):
"From The Rising Village" (1825)
IN: Atwood, 5-6; full text in Gerson & Davies, 53-70; Daymond & Monkman, I, 99-112"; Smith (1968): 3-4.
Comment: Written as early as 1825. The land is being cultivated. It is made 'home' imaginatively. Poem bestows meaning on the process of settling. The settler has to struggle and overcome his natural fears.
 
GRANDBOIS, Alain (1900-1975):
"The Ambigous Dawn”(1957)
IN: Daymond & Monkman, II, 113-114; Glassco 69.
Comment: Originally written in French. Transl. G.V. Downes. Subtle exploration of the twilight atmosphere at dawn.
 
GUM, Leona:
"Survival"
IN: Lee, 297.
Comment: Very critical of the farmers' exploitation of animals.
 
"Farming"
IN: Barbour & Stanley, 51.
Comment: Female awareness of the growing of plants, and of survival.
 
GUSTAFSON, Ralph (1909-1995):
"Green Disposition" (1974)
IN: Daymond & Monkman, II, 203-204.
Comment: Dealing with the "green/ Assertions" of the landscape.
 
"In the Yukon"
IN: Newlove, 93.
 
"At the Ocean's Verge"
IN: Newlove, 94.
Comment: Questions the traditional poetic landscape code.