Behavioral and affective correlates of the implicit power motive in children

  • The implicit power motive is one of the most researched motives in motivational psychology—at least in adults. Children have rarely been subject to investigation and there are virtually no results on behavioral and affective correlates of the implicit power motive in children. As behavior and affect are important components of conceptual validation, the empirical data in this dissertation focused on identifying three correlates, namely resource control behavior (study 1), power stress (study 2), and persuasive behavior (study 3). In each study, the implicit power motive was measured via the Picture Story Exercise, using an adapted version for children. Children across samples were between 4 and 11 years old. Results from study 1 and 2 showed that children’s power-related behavior corresponded with evidence from adult samples: children with a high implicit power motive secure attractive resources and show negative reactions to a thwarted attempt to exert influence. Study 3 contradicted existing evidence with adults in that children’s persuasive behavior was not associated with nonverbal, but with verbal strategies of persuasion. Despite this inconsistency, these results are, together with the validation of a child-friendly Picture Story Exercise version, an important step into further investigating and confirming the concept of the implicit power motive and how to measure it in children.

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Metadaten
Author:Carolin Raihala
URN:urn:nbn:de:hbz:385-1-9294
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Date of completion:2018/09/24
Publishing institution:Universität Trier
Granting institution:Universität Trier, Fachbereich 1
Date of final exam:2018/08/09
Release Date:2018/09/25
Licence (German):License LogoCC BY-NC: Creative-Commons-Lizenz: Namensnennung, Nicht kommerziell 4.0 International

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